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Humanzi
Last Post 05 Dec 2005 06:59 AM by Pilchard. 76 Replies.
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PilchardUser is Offline
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Pilchard

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05 Dec 2005 06:59 AM
    Did anyone else read the Humanzi interview in the Sunday Tribune yesterday? Did anyone else think that your man's pre-occupation with what the Irish press thought of them and all the slagging they were getting on internet boards smacked of extreme paranoia? jeez, man, they need some chill pills as opposed to cheap speed The interview is at tribune.ie but u have to register first (its free) to read it.
    RubyUser is Offline
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    Ruby

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    05 Dec 2005 07:15 AM
    copy and paste!!!
    WhoMeUser is Offline
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    WhoMe

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    05 Dec 2005 07:37 AM
    where is it on that website? i cant fecking find it
    jaypersUser is Offline
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    05 Dec 2005 07:39 AM
    I cant find it at tribune.ie
    WhoMeUser is Offline
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    WhoMe

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    05 Dec 2005 08:04 AM
    I hope we are not being punked
    Rev JulesUser is Offline
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    05 Dec 2005 08:11 AM
    Its in Tribune 2, page 14 (paper version).
    PilchardUser is Offline
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    Pilchard

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    05 Dec 2005 09:15 AM
    Sorry people - should have cut and pasted it, yes, the tribune website is utterly useless - almost as bad as the sunday business post one heres the piece... Arts The million dollar question Neil Dunphy TRYING to talk to Humanzi frontman Shaun Mulrooney without mentioning that record deal is impossible. Whether he likes it or not, it's one of the main reasons we're doing the interview. Six months ago Humanzi were just another young Dublin indie rock band, but when the A&R men came from across the water, the word got out. This sort of thing doesn't happen to everyone. Clinching a "label deal" with Fiction, which is a fairly autonomous part of the Universal leviathan, the " 1m" word got around too. Mulrooney insists this is all crap. "We're nowhere, " he says from his bus in England, making the hard yards as part of an NME club tour across Britain. "We're only starting. Maybe in Ireland we have had a good year and people know who we are. Some people hate us and some people don't. We really want to take this to another level because we know what we have is good enough." It's clear that with all the press about the deal there is a huge amount of resentment towards Humanzi, probably because there is very little material to go on. A mini Irish tour and first single, 'Fix the Cracks', behind them, their debut album is now recorded, mixed and awaiting a title and release date. The rest is done. So who hates them? "Well there is a sort of a nasty thing going on on internet chat sites, " he says. "I don't really go on chat sites but I've been told about it. There's a nasty side to these faceless people who go around and begrudge us. Nobody's heard our stuff. We got a brutal review of our single. Somebody was reviewing it in a big paper that I won't name and they didn't mention the song. They were just talking about the band. Lazy journalism really but nobody really knows what we're up to. So until the album is out I think people should stay away from judging us." What about the now infamous record contract? "Don't mind that. It's just unfortunate people latch on to these stupid things. But we got a review and it was like 'review the single don't review the band and the situation we're in'. They didn't review the single. . ." A strange predicament for any band, but there's no denying the benefits of any kind of press no matter how bad it is. It's only natural that people are going to judge the band more harshly than most. "Yeah, of course they would when they read about the deal, but would they believe it? No new band would get signed for 1m. If you were any way in the know you'd go, that's not true. But we are signed to a major and there is no denying that you are obviously going to get people knocking you for that straight away. Everybody is owned by everybody now, so it's no big deal, but the people we work with, Fiction, have given us complete people. They work with some really good bands, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Queens of the Stone Age came through there, so we are totally confident in the people around us. At the end of the day we want to sell as many records and connect to as many people as possible and you won't be able to do that on some crappy label." With major label support has come the opportunity to work with top producers and engineers, as well as securing the NME tour. Half of it was recorded with Nine Inch Nails drummer Chris Vrenna and some of it with Gareth Mannix, an up-andcoming producer who has worked with the Thrills and the Chalets among others. Here is a band that got signed with just a bunch of demos. "We gave our manager the tapes and then the company decided they would pay for us to go in and get better recordings but we ended up keeping them. So half of the album is built on the old demos and the other half is newer stuff. . . The whole album came together in this weird way. It was all done over months even though we only spent 14 days in total recording it." Once recorded, the four went over to Connecticut for the mixing with Peter Katis, who produced both Interpol albums. "We love the sound of Interpol's stuff and Peter mixed the whole thing so it sounds like a proper album now and not just a bunch of songs." The band have about five working titles and hope to draw a catch-all title picked up from the pervading mood of the album: edgy and claustrophobic. "The album is dark, moody and intense and there's not much of a breather on it either which we're getting a bit of stick for, but f**k it. . . It's 90mph for the whole thing, but we're very happy with it." Mulrooney is surprised to learn that I've heard quite a lot of it, courtesy of their manager. It sounds confident, catchy and noisy; it's rock 'n' roll all right. 'Diet Pills' has a killer bassline reminiscent of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, while on 'Out on A Wire' the Interpol/Joy Division influences are apparent but it's much more poppy, with a singalong chorus. Another one, 'I Want Silence', is dirtier, faster and has an excellent guitar run with cool keys in the background. There's a bit more to this band than hype; if only they can avoid becoming the next JJ72 and keep working hard like Bell X1. There really is no rush. Mulrooney met fellow singer/guitarist Colm Rutledge, bassist Gary Lonergan and drummer Brian Gallagher in "boozers in town" when they were all about 17 years old. "We didn't really like each other at first but ended up becoming friends over time, " says Mulrooney. "We used to drink in Bruxelles when we used to think we were the dog's bollocks. And we used go to Temple Bar Music Centre to Screamadelica." Now 23, Mulrooney writes most Humanzi lyrics. About what? "Sometimes a song is very direct like 'Diet Pills'. I was in America and looking at TV and it seemed so claustrophobic, and then I just wrote this direct song, and then other times it goes off on big tangents. There's a lot of social conscience in my writing and then there's a lot of paranoia; the feeling on a Monday morning after partying too much on the weekend, " he laughs. His favourite artists are Iggy Pop, Joy Division, Siouxsie and the Banshees and all that edgy stuff "but we all love the Stones as well. Exile on Main Street is the tour bus album." After the hype back home you get the sense that Humanzi are enjoying the hard graft of trying to win over hip English audiences who don't know anything about them. "This is where you have to do your homework, do your apprenticeship, " he says. "People are just going nuts for bands over here. We were on tour with Hard-Fi and there were millions of girls queuing up early in the day. It's like Dublin but 20 times bigger. People are into music, but the Irish press aren't taking much notice of what's happening at the moment. Every time I come back there are 10 new outstanding bands that are playing. There is a real scene there but the press don't seem to be picking up on it. They are not really current and relevant." Mulrooney is talking about a festival of young Irish bands including The Things, Mainline, Sickboy and the Zealots called Psychofest that was held in October. "It was a really current vibrant thing but it was the usual crap . . . no one from the press turned up, " he says. It's this kind of thing that could produce the next really big Irish rock band. "Yeah we hope it's us. . . but on the other hand, if it isn't I could be back in Argos packing shelves. . ."
    RubyUser is Offline
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    Ruby

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    05 Dec 2005 01:17 PM
    Good stuff.
    seancUser is Offline
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    seanc

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    05 Dec 2005 01:41 PM
    Met him on Saturday, he was locked. His enjoying himself at least. Still ain't heard any o the tunes, what do people think of them?
    MullyUser is Offline
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    Mully

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    05 Dec 2005 01:55 PM
    http://www.todayfm.com/Article.asp?id=137372 Artist of the Week on PetSounds. Single can be listened to on the link.
    seancUser is Offline
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    seanc

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    05 Dec 2005 01:59 PM
    Exquisite, cheers! I shall check it out when I get at a computer with speakers on it. yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah!!!
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    tommythecatz

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    05 Dec 2005 02:14 PM
    Wasn't the singer in a vodafone ad before?? He was in a different band then though... and a bit fatter... Maybe i'm gone loopy...
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    05 Dec 2005 02:46 PM
    Tommy, yeah, the band was listo Hey Sean, you can check out some of their tunes on their website www.humanzi.com
    DromedUser is Offline
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    Dromed

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    05 Dec 2005 03:08 PM
    quote:
    Originally posted by Mully
    http://www.todayfm.com/Article.asp?id=137372 Artist of the Week on PetSounds. Single can be listened to on the link.
    So far 83% of cats prefer it!
    seancUser is Offline
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    seanc

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    05 Dec 2005 03:36 PM
    Dunno if he was in a Vodafone ad, but he did do some of that extra stuff, so maybe. You'll see him behind the decks on a scene of Niel Jordans "Breakfast on Pluto", if that ever gets put out, with me dancing around the place too! If you watch carefully, you'll notice that no one has any shoes on!
    MullyUser is Offline
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    Mully

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    06 Dec 2005 06:39 AM
    quote:
    Originally posted by seanc
    Niel Jordans "Breakfast on Pluto", if that ever gets put out,
    Breakfast on Pluto European Premiere in aid of UNICEF Ireland. Tickets available from UNICEF Ireland on +353 1 878 3000. Savoy, Dublin Date: 11 January 2006
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    08 Dec 2005 10:58 AM
    sorry for dragging up a relatively old thread but in response to your post Pilchard, I really don't think that "your man" from humanzi being interviewed was displaying signs of "extreme paranoia". The fact of the matter is that there really has been a backlash against this band. I've witnessed it myself on various music forums/messageboards. It's only human to be disheartened hearing such venomous comments about your band when they are working their b****xes off trying to make something of themselves. I for one think they have the potential to go a long way. they all play their instruments brilliantly, have some great songs and sean mulrooney is a fantastic front man with tonnes of charisma. what is it with the irish? why are we so down on anyone who seems to get a sniff of success!! its getting really boring........why can't we by loyal to our own?? fair enough if you don't like the music but theres no need for such spitefullness!! its all the haters that need to take some chill pills!!
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    Pilchard

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    08 Dec 2005 01:21 PM
    quote:
    Originally posted by raoul
    .why can't we by loyal to our own??
    thats the reason why we've exported so many s**te bands over the years. we have to apply the same criteria we apply to every band to bands from here. for years, bands have got an easy ride from (most) irish critics and writers and commentators just cos they're irish. once they go to london or new york, they soon find out that they're just not good enough. you can count the number of internationally successful irish bands on the fingers of one hand... U2 The Corrs The Cranberries someone is sure to come back and mention Van or The Thrills but i'm talking about bands (sorry van) and bands who have sold at least a million copies of more than one album worldwide (sorry, thrills) enough said. we keep exporting dross and then wonder why it all goes wrong. if we were more honest with ourselves here, we'd have a better scene. i give humanzi 18 months before yer man is back giving out in bruxelles
    seancUser is Offline
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    seanc

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    08 Dec 2005 01:40 PM
    quote:
    Breakfast on Pluto European Premiere in aid of UNICEF Ireland. Tickets available from UNICEF Ireland on +353 1 878 3000. Savoy, Dublin Date: 11 January 2006
    Cool, I'll be making my cinema debut then.
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    08 Dec 2005 03:24 PM
    someone is sure to come back and mention Van or The Thrills but i'm talking about bands (sorry van) and bands who have sold at least a million copies of more than one album worldwide (sorry, thrills) enough said. we keep exporting dross and then wonder why it all goes wrong. if we were more honest with ourselves here, we'd have a better scene. i give humanzi 18 months before yer man is back giving out in bruxelles so the only reason you're knocking humanzi is to protect the integrity of Irish music abroad? And your means of doing that is to try and stop it from gaining any confidence in the foreign market just in case the foreign market laugh at it for being, heaven forbid, awful music, because no where else in the world is there bad music being made. Pathetic. Fair play to HUmanzi and all Irish bands like them for at least getting out there. flick through MTV any time and you will see the so called 'quality' that England is producing at the moment or America. This ethos of knocking your own in order to protect the future of Irish music is intellectual masturbation. gets you nowhere.
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