Discussion Forums

CD inlay cards
Last Post 17 Nov 2005 07:46 PM by indiecater. 2 Replies.
Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
indiecaterUser is Offline
New Member
New Member
Send Private Message
Posts:55
indiecater

--
17 Nov 2005 07:46 PM
    Has anyone come up with the novel idea of selling the original artwork that you get when you buy CD's from the downtown (rip-off) merchants. There are loads of ways to download music (i)legally yet if you wish to burn to CD you are stuck with a grainy home printer job. Lets face it half the fun of listening to music is leafing through the accompanying artwork at the same time. Having the original shiny version would be nice. Perhaps I am not looking in the wrong places. Can you advise?
    KarlitoUser is Offline
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:210
    Karlito

    --
    18 Nov 2005 01:50 AM
    Yip yip, know what you mean, that why I think CD's will not fade out. Plastic covers with print outs aren't really the same, but I'd say you could get a work around, but other covers, like special editions (Radiohead's Hail to The Theif, Sigur Ros' Von and Takk...) can't really be reproduced. There are other albums which the covers and inlay cards have been deadly and adds to the whole package, example: SFA's Phantom Phorce whereby you make up the sleeve to be like an old style Arcade game and you can put you're portable CD player into it and listen to it from the Arcade Machine - class. Jaysus, that was a bit of waffle and off topic wasn't it, sorry. To answer you question - no, no original Idea.
    BinokularUser is Offline
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Send Private Message
    Posts:1665
    Binokular

    --
    18 Nov 2005 07:27 AM
    It's an original idea, but not exactly one that makes economic sense for two reasons. First, the artwork probably costs more to produce in terms of manufacturing cost (not taking royalties into account) than the actual CD. Second, it aids piracy, not simply what the music industry often refers to as piracy like copying a CD from a friend or downloading a few tracks from the net, but proper, wholesale, large-scale criminal piracy where masses of counterfeit discs are sold. What's to stop enterprising scum from buying huge amounts of genuine CD covers, filling them with counterfeit CDs and passing them off as the real thing? Ironically though it would mean that record company actually recoups some money, normally totally lost through piracy! Maybe it would work for SE asia? Rather than fighting the pirates, see them as an alternative distribution network?
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Active Forums 4.3